Archive for the ‘Solaris’ Category

Sweet, succulent magic. It seduces us and traps us; mesmerized, we can’t and don’t want to get away. And Heirs of the Demon King Uprising by Sarah Cawkwell is flush with it. Uprising is all about the magic. Although once free flowing, admired, and respected, magic is now outlawed in England. King Richard the Fifth rules with an iron hand with the aid of his Inquisitors who route out magic wherever it is found. However, small pockets of magic users exist, including Mathias Eynon and his betrothed, Tagan. Soon Richard must choose to complete the supreme sacrifice to cement his reign, a demonic bargain made by his royal ancestors. Mathias and Tagan are chosen to band together with other magical beings to fight this coming evil. Will the young lovers and their comrades be able to vanquish the demons or will the monstrosities prove victorious and bring hell to earth?

This is a fast-paced, exciting light vs. dark tale. One of the characters reminded me a bit of The Three Musketeers’ Aramis – or perhaps Johnny Depp’s Captain Sparrow – the flamboyant, foppish, lady lover who we love to hate and hate to love. Cawkwell has given us good-guy characters that are easily likeable. She has also provided us a couple of baddies that call out for boos, hisses, and tomatoes. The central villain, Inquisitor Charles Weaver, is fairly evil to the core which actually seems to make him both odious and appealing at the same time.

If there were any failings with Uprising, I would have to say it was our main heroes, Mathias and Tagan. Son of an executed magic user, Mathias’ mother fades to oblivion and he ends up being raised by a master magician. Tagan is the daughter of a blacksmith, raised on the forge. Both of these characters seemed to need more development. They just needed a bit more maturing, perhaps.

However, the story and settings are fully thought out and have a rich feel to them. The pacing is quick, lively, and suspenseful. Cawkwell’s Uprising will keep you on the edge. You won’t want to put this one down.

 

 

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Talus and The Frozen King by Graham Edwards is a good start to what could possibly become a great series of mysteries. The cover promotes the book by saying “Introducing The World’s First Detective.” And I truly got that feeling when main character, Talus, a bard and our “first detective” utters the phrase, “…there’s no time to lose!” I had visions of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson (only wearing bear skins and with greasy hair) chasing the baddies in their black hansoms down a darkened, narrow, cobblestone English road! The similarities are very apparent – Talus observes everything and deduces the truth from each clue. His sidekick, Bran, originally a fisherman, is our somewhat bumbling Watson, typically preferring brawn to brains. There is even a Moriarty, “Mishina”, a shaman, who plays to Talus’ weakness for solving challenging mysteries.

What I really found unique here was the world into which these characters are thrust – the cold, icy, coastal realm inhabited by isolated tribes of Neolithic peoples. Edwards brings them to life with their rituals that seem very alien to us. Mud-painted faces, stone tools, bone weapons, are all rich details that add to the raw feeling of the island of Creyak where someone has murdered the king.

Talus is a very interesting character. He searches for his humanity, his brilliance often seems to dull his true emotions for as he analyzes each clue, he begins to analyze his relationships with friends and lovers. His physical appearance is appealing, too, with his bald head, rail thin body, and tattered robes. Bran is our more down-to-earth, emotional character. He has suffered great loss, both emotionally and physically. Strong and human, Bran is the perfect complement to Talus’s logical mind. They work as a pair to expose the murderous plot and at the same time discover some truths about their own pysches.

Bran will continue to follow Talus on a quest north, to the top of the world. They will most certainly find more adventures and mysteries to solve as they continue their journey. The game’s afoot, Bran!

 

As a book reviewer I’m able to get my hands on more upcoming books than most sane people should be able to. However…. there are always those few precious shiny arcs that allude my grasp. Here is my list of current Books Worth Dying For:

A Different Kingdom by Paul Kearney (Solaris Books)

Michael Fay is a normal boy, living with his grandparents on their family farm in rural Ireland. In the woods—once thought safe and well-explored—there are wolves; and other, stranger things. He keeps them from his family, even his Aunt Rose, his closest friend, until the day he finds himself in the Other Place. There are wild people, and terrible monsters, and a girl called Cat.
When the wolves follow him from the Other Place to his family’s doorstep, Michael must choose between locking the doors and looking away—or following Cat on an adventure that may take an entire lifetime in the Other Place. He will become a man, and a warrior, and confront the Devil himself: the terrible Dark Horseman..

I’ve read a little of Kearney’s previous work and the man is ridiculously talented. I’ve been drooling over this one.

Traitor’s Blade by Sebastien de Castell (Jo Fletcher Books)

Falcio is the first Cantor of the Greatcoats. Trained in the fighting arts and the laws of Tristia, the Greatcoats are traveling Magisters upholding King’s Law. They are heroes. Or at least they were, until they stood aside while the Dukes took the kingdom, and impaled their King’s head on a spike.

Now Tristia is on the verge of collapse and the barbarians are sniffing at the borders. The Dukes bring chaos to the land, while the Greatcoats are scattered far and wide, reviled as traitors, their legendary coats in tatters.

All they have left are the promises they made to King Paelis, to carry out one final mission. But if they have any hope of fulfilling the King’s dream, the divided Greatcoats must reunite, or they will also have to stand aside as they watch their world burn…

I don’t need to say much except.. I Want. I Want. I Want.

The Three By Sarah Lotz (Hodderscape)
They’re here … The boy. The boy watch the boy watch the dead people oh Lordy there’s so many … They’re coming for me now. We’re all going soon. All of us. Pastor Len warn them that the boy he’s not to??–

The last words of Pamela May Donald (1961 – 2012)

Black Thursday. The day that will never be forgotten. The day that four passenger planes crash, at almost exactly the same moment, at four different points around the globe.

There are only four survivors. Three are children, who emerge from the wreckage seemingly unhurt. But they are not unchanged. And the fourth is Pamela May Donald, who lives just long enough to record a voice message on her phone. A message that will change the world.

This one snuck up on me, sounds brilliant though.

 

Stolen Songbird by Danielle L. Jensen (Strange Chemistry)
For five centuries, a witch’s curse has bound the trolls to their city beneath the ruins of Forsaken Mountain. Time enough for their dark and nefarious magic to fade from human memory and into myth. But a prophesy has been spoken of a union with the power to set the trolls free, and when Cécile de Troyes is kidnapped and taken beneath the mountain, she learns there is far more to the myth of the trolls than she could have imagined.

Cécile has only one thing on her mind after she is brought to Trollus: escape. Only the trolls are clever, fast, and inhumanly strong. She will have to bide her time, wait for the perfect opportunity.

But something unexpected happens while she’s waiting – she begins to fall for the enigmatic troll prince to whom she has been bonded and married. She begins to make friends. And she begins to see that she may be the only hope for the half-bloods – part troll, part human creatures who are slaves to the full-blooded trolls. There is a rebellion brewing. And her prince, Tristan, the future king, is its secret leader.

As Cécile becomes involved in the intricate political games of Trollus, she becomes more than a farmer’s daughter. She becomes a princess, the hope of a people, and a witch with magic powerful enough to change Trollus forever.

Certain YA books are either huge hits or misses for me. Stolen Songbird sounds like it might be something truly special.

Morningside Fall by Jay Posey (Angry Robot Books)
The lone gunman Three is gone, and Wren is the new governor of the devastated settlement of Morningside, but there is turmoil in the city. When his life is put in danger, Wren is forced to flee Morningside until he and his retinue can determine who can be trusted.

They arrive at the border outpost, Ninestory, only to find it has been infested with Weir in greater numbers than anyone has ever seen. These lost, dangerous creatures are harbouring a terrible secret – one that will have consequences not just for Wren and his comrades, but for the future of what remains of the world.

Three by Jay Posey was fantastic, Morningside Fall, might just be better.

 

 

 

The Shadow Master by Craig Cormick (Angry Robot Books)
In a land riven with plague, in the infamous Walled City, two families vie for control – the Medicis with their genius inventor Leonardo; the Lorraines with Galileo, the most brilliant alchemist of his generation.

And when two star-crossed lovers, one from either house, threaten the status quo, a third, shadowy power – one that forever seems a step ahead of all of the familial warring – plots and schemes, and bides its time, ready for the moment to attack…

Another Angry Robot Book common man… Sorry, but AR doesn’t disappoint often, this one oozes excellence.

 

 

 

 

 

Yarrick: Imperial Creed by David Annandale (Black Library)
Yarrick: the very name carries the weight of legend, of great deeds and of wars won for the Imperium.
But Sebastian Yarrick, who fought on Armageddon, who Space Marine Chapter Masters show their fealty to on bended knee, was not always Lord Commissar. He was once just a man, a newly minted officer from the ranks of the schola progenium.

His first mission under the tutelage of Lord Commissar Rasp was on Mistral. Here, an uprising of barons had upset the delicate balance of power. But, as Yarrick was soon forced to learn, Mistral and Imperial politics are often murky, the truth seldom clear cut. As war engulfs the world, a plot unravels that pits old friends against one another and fashions unusual alliances. Chaos cults, the fanatical Adepta Sororitas and clandestine inquisitors all stand between Yarrick and his mission. Here is where the legend began. In this crucible was Lord Commissar Sebastian Yarrick forged in blood.

More Yarrick. Imperial Guard. David Annandale. Count me in.

Have a recent book that you think is Worth Dying For? Let me know!